Tuesday, March 2nd 2021

Intel Confirms March 30 for Rocket Lake-S Launch

Intel in a statement to Hardwareluxx has confirmed that the release date for the company's next-gen CPU family, codenamed Rocket Lake-S, will indeed see a global launch come March 30th. The 11000 family of CPUs is already being sold on Germany, however, via etailer Mindfactory.de, who apparently jumped the gun on the actual availability of said CPUs. Mindfactory only ships within Germany, meaning that that country is actually the sole current field for Intel's latest-gen CPUs. The etailer says that they have the right to sell the CPUs, and stands by its decision, which likely means that their supplier failed to convey the proper NDAs and launch dates when selling - or so we're led to believe. That's the reason why benchmarks of Intel's 11000-series are already in the wild - even for currently unannounced CPUs, such as the Core i7-11700K.

WCCFTech over the weekend got their hands on the full table for Intel's upcoming Core i9 and Core i7 products (at least those available at launch). Mainstream CPUs on the Core i5 family and below weren't listed, however. It remains to be seen whether the previously speculated March 15th launch date will actually be the official announcement date from Intel, of if something else is afoot for that particular day of March.
Sources: Videocardz, WCCFTech
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44 Comments on Intel Confirms March 30 for Rocket Lake-S Launch

#1
Object55
How might have fallen... Intel who ? What they make ? CPU's ? Nah, never heard of them.
Posted on Reply
#2
kapone32
Object55
How might have fallen... Intel who ? What they make ? CPU's ? Nah, never heard of them.
Too bad it's only in mind share
Posted on Reply
#4
Mats
thebluebumblebee
They have 10 different SKUs for 8 core CPUs!
Maybe you missed it, but the amount of SKU's is the new benchmark. The morer, the betterier.
Posted on Reply
#5
CrAsHnBuRnXp
There is 0 reason to get an i7 k varient over an i9 k varient in terms of overclocking. For the most part, they are identical. Intel fucked up making the i9's 8 core with everything else.
Posted on Reply
#6
mouacyk
Mats
Maybe you missed it, but the amount of SKU's is the new benchmark. The morer, the betterier.
Must be a reason for why I see Cache=16 across all the SKU's... Never before have we seen i7 and i9 differ just by clock speeds. Sure is a new direction by new CEO to make Intel great again.
Posted on Reply
#7
Colddecked
mouacyk
Must be a reason for why I see Cache=16 across all the SKU's... Never before have we seen i7 and i9 differ just by clock speeds. Sure is a new direction by new CEO to make Intel great again.
To be fair, there wasn't anything he could do about things that were planned for this year so he deserves a mulligan on this. What matters is the launch after Rocket Lake and how he handles that.
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#8
MxPhenom 216
ASIC Engineer
inb4 everyone is all like "FuCk InTeL!!!!"
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#9
Why_Me
MxPhenom 216
inb4 everyone is all like "FuCk InTeL!!!!"
Bam! I've never seen so many posters suffering from small pen0r syndrome than on here every time something is posted about Intel.
Posted on Reply
#10
Makaveli
Why_Me
Bam! I've never seen so many posters suffering from small pen0r syndrome than on here every time something is posted about Intel.
You have people like this on both sides just ignore them.

I'm waiting for this review on march 30 but more interested in Alderlake at the end of the year.
Posted on Reply
#11
Mats
Why_Me
Bam! I've never seen so many posters suffering from small pen0r syndrome than on here every time something is posted about Intel.
The same syndrome goes for Intel. With Alder Lake being surprisingly close to launch, Intel doesn't really scream confidence when it comes to Rocket Lake.
I'd guess most posters find this weird, and ten 8C SKU's doesn't make the impression better. Maybe one need some kind of syndrome to ignore all that..

As for performance, I'm pretty sure it will run pretty well, not so sure about efficiency tho. But still, the launches are way too close.
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#12
freeagent
5.3 single core @ stock is pretty cool.. crazy how fast those things wind up to out of the box now.
Posted on Reply
#13
efikkan
thebluebumblebee
They have 10 different SKUs for 8 core CPUs!
Not counting the Xeon counterparts! :D
Posted on Reply
#14
dgianstefani
These are going to shred for gaming/lightly threaded applications when paired with top ram and properly cooled. Interested to see what kind of IMC improvements come with their first new (not just tweaked) IMC for desktop in 5 years.

For everything else Ryzen 5000 will be better.
Posted on Reply
#15
mouacyk
dgianstefani
These are going to shred for gaming/lightly threaded applications when paired with top ram and properly cooled. Interested to see what kind of IMC improvements come with their first new (not just tweaked) IMC for desktop in 5 years.

For everything else Ryzen 5000 will be better.
That seems to be the sole focus for Rocket-Lake -- to claim back gaming performance at all cost. And then use the fame of the top-dog SKU to sell everything else, fame by association, marketing 101.
Posted on Reply
#16
Mats
dgianstefani
For everything else Ryzen 5000 will be better.
Or, just wait for Alder Lake! Not everyone wants a Ryzen.
Posted on Reply
#17
dgianstefani
Well, people tend to forget 90%+ of computer usage in the world doesn't need more than 6 cores. Single threaded is still paramount, while having enough cores to get through typical workloads/gaming.

Single core performance is always relevant, multicore performance is only relevant in certain situations and those situations diminish the more cores you add.

Obviously I currently use a 5950x so having moar cores is appreciated, but I actually use those cores.

So many nerds get number boners and forget that the numbers are theoretical.
Posted on Reply
#18
Caring1
mouacyk
That seems to be the sole focus for Rocket-Lake -- to claim back gaming performance at all cost. And then use the fame of the top-dog SKU to sell everything else, fame by association, marketing 101.
Yep, no single core TVB on the F series, so Intel won't pit that against AMD in Benchmarks.
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#19
watzupken
So Intel is still going ahead with the preorder 2 weeks before independent reviews get rolled out? If so, this is probably the most absurd thing to do. If they are trying to win people's confidence, this certainly is not helping. In fact given that Alder Lake is expected in Q4 is not helping.
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#20
dicobalt
Comes with a free fire extinguisher.
Posted on Reply
#21
hat
Enthusiast
Mats
Maybe you missed it, but the amount of SKU's is the new benchmark. The morer, the betterier.
Maybe it's time someone modified that old "MAKE MOAR CORES" meme about AMD for Intel and SKUs.
Posted on Reply
#23
syrup
freeagent
5.3 single core @ stock is pretty cool.. crazy how fast those things wind up to out of the box now.
I think crazy how slow, being a budding enthusiast from an earlier era. 1991 to 2001 went from 50 MHz to 2 GHz, 2011 to 2021 we've gone from 3.9 GHz to 5.2 GHz. Could put a finger on the scale a bit by factoring in core count, but that can also just be lumped in with architectural advancements in general. Much slower progress however you slice it.

Has its upsides though. In the mid-90s, to splurge on a top-end home/SOHO rig sans monitor not only meant spending $5000+ (in today's dollars), but also accepting it'd be severely outclassed within a couple of years.
Posted on Reply
#24
1d10t
Missing i5 and i3 part? Maybe this is a good time for i5 and i3 owner to get an upgrade, if they already on Z board of course.

edited
Found some leaks, there will be i5 some time in future. The way I see, it could be worse than Zen to Zen+ transition in term of performance.
Posted on Reply
#25
Mysteoa
I would go for 11700K or F variant, all others seem pointless.
Posted on Reply
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